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Conversations

"Hanau, NSU & NSU 2.0 – Racist Continuities and Antiracist Resistance in Hesse"
Workshop with Ayşe Güleç & Gözde Saçıak

The workshop will be held in German.
Registration at workshop@temporarydialects.org

Apr 16, 2021 | 7 PM

Joana Tischkau

Colonastics

“Colonastics was made during the first wave of the Corona Pandemic in Spring/Summer 2020. Even though the work was first received as a live workshop format it seemed to also fit perfectly in the current climate of home-office, home-schooling, home-cooking and home-cleaning. Because, of course, there were also home-workout sessions via YouTube and Zoom. Colonastics, which is a ...

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Joana Tischkau, born 1983 in Göttingen, Germany, is a choreographer and performer. Her first dancing memory goes back to Kaoma’s 1989 hit Lambada at a children's birthday party which led her to enroll at ...

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“Colonastics was made during the first wave of the Corona Pandemic in Spring/Summer 2020. Even though the work was first received as a live workshop format it seemed to also fit perfectly in the current climate of home-office, home-schooling, home-cooking and home-cleaning. Because, of course, there were also home-workout sessions via YouTube and Zoom. Colonastics, which is a fitness workout that doubles up as a critical whiteness lecture, has been with me for some time now. The concept emerged long before the violent killing of George Floyd and the now famous Central Park incident that captures white embodiment so perfectly*. As I mainly create for theatre spaces, this was the only format in the back of my projects folder that I believed could also function digitally. For me it works as a reminder that even though this moment might have felt like a pause, the white supremacist, capitalist patriarchy, as bell hooks would say, doesn’t grant us a ‚rest day‘.

In this very moment, sofas and kitchen tables are being pushed to the side to make space for yoga mats. Bedrooms are turned into exercise parcours and carpets must give way to weightlifting areas. At the core of his new-found quarantine life is the very present idea that you can re-emerge as a stronger, fitter and better version of yourself. Even through this crisis we must believe in the modernist myth of unlimited and constant progress. Whether practiced in the safe environment of your newly created home gym or in the studio: what Yoga, Zumba, Pole Dancing and Breaklaethics have in common is that their vocabulary feeds off an imaginary esoteric and exotic space and bodies that are constructed as the ‚other‘. Colonastics also invites you to clear your surroundings for a sweaty work-out that decolonizes your body, mind and spirit. Take part in a physical practice that developed out of the unmarked embodiment of whiteness and which carves out a blueprint of white masculine embodiment from which it sheds light onto the colonial and neo-colonial practices of the fitness industry. Because at last maybe you can have it all; the rationality of a straight white man paired with the physicality and corporeality of a black woman.

Let’s get physical!”

– Joana Tischkau

* Link

Joana Tischkau, born 1983 in Göttingen, Germany, is a choreographer and performer. Her first dancing memory goes back to Kaoma’s 1989 hit Lambada at a children's birthday party which led her to enroll at her neighborhood dance school for training in Jazz dance, videoclip dancing and Hip Hop. Looking old enough to get in, she continued her movement practice in Clubs, Discos and at urban dance battles, winning twerking competitions before it was even a thing. In 2010 she decided to make it official, left Germany for the UK, to study Contemporary Dance and Theatre at Coventry University, mastering the art of accessing somatic experiences while rolling on the floor and across bodies. She went on to pursue her MA in Choreography at the Institute for Applied Theatre Studies in Giessen, developing her artistic practice into a hybrid mash-up where the writings of bell hooks meet beatboxing, whiteness is turned into a workout, YouTube tutorials become her only source material and Roberto Blanco is hailed as an Afro-German Hero, subversively distorting cultural practices, codes and meaning inscribed onto bodies of Colour within the context of western art and dance history. She works as a freelance choreographer, dancer, community dance artist and movement facilitator and has performed her works at the Tanzplattform Deutschland 2020, Künstlerhaus Mousonturm, Danshallerne Copenhagen and Hebbel am Ufer Theater Berlin.

Joana lives and works in Frankfurt/Main and Berlin.

"The Wall Fell on Our Heads"

Diane Izabiliza

In individual and group interviews, five feminists of color were interviewed about their political activism against racism and sexism with regard to the period of German reunification. The film explores how they experienced the profound political change, the meaning of German reunification for them and how they experienced the subsequent rise of racist violence. The documentary is from the practice research project Erinnerungsorte. Vergessene und verwobene Geschichte(n) and ...

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Diane Izabiliza is co-director of the Berlin Project Fund for Cultural Education. She has worked as an educator and studied social work and socio-cultural studies in Berlin and Brandenburg. Her research interests include (anti-)racism, ...

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In individual and group interviews, five feminists of color were interviewed about their political activism against racism and sexism with regard to the period of German reunification. The film explores how they experienced the profound political change, the meaning of German reunification for them and how they experienced the subsequent rise of racist violence.

The documentary is from the practice research project Erinnerungsorte. Vergessene und verwobene Geschichte(n) and is integrated on the website www.verwobenegeschichten.de. The film thus aims to add another contribution to this archive of resistance and memory of marginalised histories.

Diane Izabiliza is co-director of the Berlin Project Fund for Cultural Education. She has worked as an educator and studied social work and socio-cultural studies in Berlin and Brandenburg. Her research interests include (anti-)racism, gender, politics of remembrance, postcolonial theories and critical migration research. Diane Izabiliza was involved in the development of the website Verwobene Geschichte*n, which also features her film The Wall Fell on Our Heads. In 2019, she was a lecturer at the Diversity Studies/Racism and Migration department at Alice Salomon Hochschule, Berlin. Since April 2020 she is co-host of the feminist radio show talking feminisms.

Nejbir Erkol

Çukur

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In her work Çukur/Hole, Nejbir Erkol deals with a mortar attack which hit the Turkish-Syrian border in 2019, exactly 97 steps from her house in Nusaybin, as part of the Turkish government-led military offensive called "Operation Peace Spring." Because of the heavy rain from the previous day, it did not explode. Nejbir Erkol deals with vulnerability and precariousness, focusing on the feelings evoked by the memory of the ...

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Nejbir Erkol (b. 1995, Nusaybin) completed her education in Mardin Artuklu University, Faculty of Fine Arts, Department of Painting in 2018 and is currently a master student at the Hacettepe University, Fine Arts, Painting ...

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In her work Çukur/Hole, Nejbir Erkol deals with a mortar attack which hit the Turkish-Syrian border in 2019, exactly 97 steps from her house in Nusaybin, as part of the Turkish government-led military offensive called "Operation Peace Spring." Because of the heavy rain from the previous day, it did not explode. Nejbir Erkol deals with vulnerability and precariousness, focusing on the feelings evoked by the memory of the attack. This memory appears as visions of the hole, even in landscapes in front of her new apartment in Istanbul. Çukur is an ongoing research consisting of images and writings transcribed from a series of voice recordings, dealing with the reappearance of the hole, the "mark", the "stain", searching for related extensions.

In the artist's own words:
"The word "precarious" contains meanings such as uncertainty, transience, fragility and instability.

Etymological origin of the word; in Latin "precari", "precor", "prex" are the same as the word "pray" in English. "Prex" means "to will," "to ask," and "to pray." Accordingly, it infers "a revocable permission obtained by prayer, which is therefore not guaranteed, or something obtained by a revocable acquiescence, which may be terminated."

Following Nicolas Bourriaud's "Precarious Constructions," "precarious" is something that has an uncertain status. It is based on uncertain promises, fortuitous circumstances, or vague developments.¹

Ethically, precarity is the dependence of one's life on the life of another. Judith Butler thus indicates that, in a sense, one's life is always in the hands of others.² In her book, Precarious Life, she speaks of two different dimensions of precarity. First, by emphasizing the concepts of vulnerability and mortality, she creates an ontological situation that applies to all living beings. This refers to the situation that we are connected not only to those we know but also to those we do not know, thus reminding us that our lives are in the hands of others. The other dimension of precarity is the differential distribution of existential and collective fragility. That is, all living things are fragile and mortal, but some are more vulnerable depending on the historical, political, geographic, and economic context. "The geopolitical distribution of vulnerability," she says, is determined by the politics that decide who is counted as a subject, whose life is worth living, and whose death is worth mourning."

¹ Nicolas Bourriaud, Precarious Constructions.
² Judith Butler, Precarious life: the powers of mourning and violence.

Nejbir Erkol (b. 1995, Nusaybin) completed her education in Mardin Artuklu University, Faculty of Fine Arts, Department of Painting in 2018 and is currently a master student at the Hacettepe University, Fine Arts, Painting department. Erkol’s artistic practice consists of video, installation, painting and performance. Through her conceptual imagery in her works, she tries to bring the subject into existence which is in contact with traumatic events and always confronting the painful.

TITIA

Sharon Jamila Hutchinson

TITIA is a testimonial document about state and police violence at the interface between essay and documentary. The film shows urban scenes in the geographical and political triangle of France, Paris / UK, London / Germany, Frankfurt. The portrayal of black subjects in public space is carefully woven into an interview setting: Vanessa Eileen Thompson and Ewelina Pepiak complement the photographic approach to Blackness and migrant expressions of ...

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Sharon Jamila Hutchinson initially studied Contemporary Dance at the University of Music and Dance, before continuing her studies at the Giessen Institute for Applied Theatre Studies and Paris 8, Saint Denis, Paris. In recent ...

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TITIA is a testimonial document about state and police violence at the interface between essay and documentary. The film shows urban scenes in the geographical and political triangle of France, Paris / UK, London / Germany, Frankfurt. The portrayal of black subjects in public space is carefully woven into an interview setting: Vanessa Eileen Thompson and Ewelina Pepiak complement the photographic approach to Blackness and migrant expressions of subject status with social, cultural and literary scientific expertise.

In the face of the brutal renaissance of the juxtaposition of the self and the other, anti-Semitic, anti-Muslim, LGBTQI+-hostile, racist and sexist exclusions, assaults and murders, TITIA, together with experts, emphatically asks: What is the relationship between the state, justice, protection and civil-society intervention?

In solidarity with all relatives, survivors and those murdered by police and state violence, including omitted investigations and failure of authorities.

Sharon Jamila Hutchinson initially studied Contemporary Dance at the University of Music and Dance, before continuing her studies at the Giessen Institute for Applied Theatre Studies and Paris 8, Saint Denis, Paris.

In recent years, she has steadily pursued the interweaving of scientific and artistic interests, in order to create spaces for the mutual informing of artistic and documentary activity. In complementary contexts, Hutchinson works freely as a performer, choreographer and filmmaker alongside her studies.

Building on her work TITIA (2020), she complemented the primarily sociological approach of Ewelina Pepiak and Vanessa E. Thompson on the entanglements of anti-democratic tendencies and state violence with an activist angle in cooperation with Frankfurt actors in erst zuerst dann wieder (2020/2021).

Meanwhile, in the performing arts, Hutchinson follows her interest in bodies as sites of memory and instruments of testimony.

Most recently as a performer in the piece Gespenster der Arbeit as part of the Gegen das Vergessen in the Naxoshallen, her studies on narratives of young femininity, Sara Trawöger's Sie leiden lieber stumm, as well as in her current play development toss and turn, with Lua Mariell Barros Heckmanns, which will be performed as part of the Nocturnal Unrest festival, “a feminist festival for theory, performance and radical Flâneuserie" in May 2021.

Selma Selman

Superposition

“In my work Superposition, I perform as the trainer, fighter and opponent simultaneously by punching myself, encouraging, defending and attacking myself at the same time. My performance exposes and neutralizes perceived contradictions of identity – allowing audiences to see the fluidity and possibility built-in to all relations, spaces, times and bodies. With my body and identities as Roma, female and immigrant, I can become anything necessary as the ...

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Selma Selman (b.1991) is from Bosnia and Herzegovina and is of Romani origin. She earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2014 from Banja Luka University’s Department of Painting In 2018 she graduated from ...

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“In my work Superposition, I perform as the trainer, fighter and opponent simultaneously by punching myself, encouraging, defending and attacking myself at the same time. My performance exposes and neutralizes perceived contradictions of identity – allowing audiences to see the fluidity and possibility built-in to all relations, spaces, times and bodies.

With my body and identities as Roma, female and immigrant, I can become anything necessary as the circumstance demands. Similar to the impossible situation which I am performing, I become my own opponent, my trainer and my hero.”

– Selma Selman

Selma Selman (b.1991) is from Bosnia and Herzegovina and is of Romani origin. She earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2014 from Banja Luka University’s Department of Painting In 2018 she graduated from Syracuse University with a Master of Fine Arts in Transmedia, Visual and Performing Arts.

In her art works, the ultimate aim is to protect and enable female bodies and enact a cross-scalar approach to collective self-emancipation of oppressed women. Selma’s search for functional, contemporary political resistance stems from her personal experience with oppression from various directions and scales. Selman is also the founder of the organization Get The Heck To School which aims to empower Roma girls all around the world who faced ostracization from society and poverty.

Selma Selman currently lives and works in Bihac, BIH and New York, USA.

This makes me want to predict the past

Cana Bilir-Meier

The Super 8 film with the title This makes me want to predict the past, portrays a group of migrant teenagers at Munich's Olympia shopping centre, where nine post-migrant youths were murdered during a racist attack in 2016, and many people were seriously injured. The camera in the film follows two young teenagers in their daily exploration of the shopping mall while they address their dreams and hopes, ...

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Cana Bilir-Meier, studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Art Education and Fine Arts at the School for Independent Film Friedl Kubelka in Vienna, and at Sabancı University in Istanbul. In 2019 she ...

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The Super 8 film with the title This makes me want to predict the past, portrays a group of migrant teenagers at Munich's Olympia shopping centre, where nine post-migrant youths were murdered during a racist attack in 2016, and many people were seriously injured.

The camera in the film follows two young teenagers in their daily exploration of the shopping mall while they address their dreams and hopes, as well as fears and nightmares. Again and again, fiction and reality are mixed together, scenes from the play Düşler Ülkesi from 1982, are taken up and different time levels are blended. The contradiction of wanting to predict the past implied in the title, refers to the continuous and intersectional experience of racism that the youths of the 1980s share with those of today. At the same time, it is also a playful stimulus to break out of customary patterns of thought, structures and developments.

The title of the play Düşler Ülkesi (Eng.: Land of Dreams) refers to Erman Okay’s eponymous theatre play for children and youths that premiered in Munich in 1982. Amateur actresses and actors with and without a migrant background played everyday scenes from the life of so-called guest workers and also addressed unfulfilled longings, broken promises, prejudices, and misunderstandings. It was a pioneering project that brought together youths with diverse backgrounds in a joint process to establish mutual understanding. The premiere of the play was overshadowed by a bomb threat against the theatre.

Bilir-Meier came across this story because her mother, the youth and children’s behaviour-therapist and pedagogue Zühal Bilir-Meier, was co-directing the play and was an actress in the play, but also wrote her diploma thesis about working with young people at the theatre.

Cana Bilir-Meier, studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Art Education and Fine Arts at the School for Independent Film Friedl Kubelka in Vienna, and at Sabancı University in Istanbul. In 2019 she received the Bayerischen Kunstförderpreis für Kunst im öffentlichen Raum, in 2018 she was a laureate of the ars viva award from Kulturkreis der deutschen Wirtschaft and in 2016 of the Birgit Jürgenssen Award. She works as a filmmaker and artist and in art and cultural education projects. Her filmic, performative, and text-based works move at the intersections of archival work, text production, historical research, and contemporary media reflexivity or archaeology.

Aslı Özdemir

maiden name

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Özdemir – Der Hocker
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Özdemir – Die Vision
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Özdemir – Das blaue Kleid Aslı 
Özdemir – Die Heilige
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Özdemir – Die symmetirsche List
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Özdemir – Die große Familie
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Özdemir – Der Gürtelumfang
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Özdemir – An einem Oktober in Canakkale
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Özdemir – Dort oben auf dem Schrank
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Özdemir – Die vier von damals
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Özdemir – Die Wichtigkeit der Wunder
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Özdemir – Eine Surrealistin

Children see their mothers as heroic figures. This perception changes, when the child passes a certain age. This change is particularly striking between mothers and daughters, because at some point not only mother and daughter face each other, but two adult women who are in different life cycles. At a certain point, the daughter begins to discover parallels in her own person and the person of the mother, ...

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Aslı Özdemir (born 1993, Erbach i. Odw.) has been studying art at the Hochschule für Gestaltung Offenbach since 2014. Her artistic practice consists of photography, writing, installation and performance. Within the last two years, ...

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Children see their mothers as heroic figures. This perception changes, when the child passes a certain age. This change is particularly striking between mothers and daughters, because at some point not only mother and daughter face each other, but two adult women who are in different life cycles. At a certain point, the daughter begins to discover parallels in her own person and the person of the mother, to perceive her as a woman, to take on characteristics unawares or have experiences similar to her at a certain age or as a woman.

This universal theme brought Aslı Özdemir to her work mädchenname, which translates from Turkish kızlık soyadı. In Turkish, kızlık soyadı refers to a woman's maiden name, her last name before marriage, which is used as a kind of synonym for past youth.

With mädchenname, Özdemir poses the question of the extent to which the past of another life can shape one's own present and the extent to which the past can be affected through subjective and Özdemir’s artistic narrative.

Aslı Özdemir (born 1993, Erbach i. Odw.) has been studying art at the Hochschule für Gestaltung Offenbach since 2014. Her artistic practice consists of photography, writing, installation and performance. Within the last two years, her focus has increasingly been on photography.

The medium of photography wants to approach a supposedly objective truth, to capture it. Yet this truth always remains subjective, as it can only be depicted from a certain perspective. In her works, Aslı Özdemir does not seek objective truths, but wants to use the medium to create a space between reality and fiction. The artist draws inspiration for her staged pictorial worlds from autobiographical events. Photography offers her a stage on which she can depict an "impossibility" that, on the one hand, draws its core from reality and, on the other, constantly contradicts it.

Furthermore, she has been active in the field of semi-professional theatre since 2016. She is currently staging the play BLAUE STUNDE., which she wrote herself. The premiere is scheduled for September this year.

The artist lives and works in Offenbach am Main.


Mercedes Matrix

Selma Selman

“In the work Mercedes Matrix, my family and I destroy a status symbol of capitalism – the Mercedes Benz – on Kampnagel Piazza in Hamburg. Through the act of demolishing the valued vehicle we co-opt the mechanisms of performance to transform my family’s survival labor into art. My family has depended on converting metal waste into a resource to support themselves. By both transmuting and synthesizing the labor ...

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Selma Selman (b.1991) is from Bosnia and Herzegovina and is of Romani origin. She earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2014 from Banja Luka University’s Department of Painting In 2018 she graduated from ...

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“In the work Mercedes Matrix, my family and I destroy a status symbol of capitalism – the Mercedes Benz – on Kampnagel Piazza in Hamburg. Through the act of demolishing the valued vehicle we co-opt the mechanisms of performance to transform my family’s survival labor into art. My family has depended on converting metal waste into a resource to support themselves. By both transmuting and synthesizing the labor of survival with artistic labor, I expose the immanent mechanism of valuation itself.”

– Selma Selman

Selma Selman (b.1991) is from Bosnia and Herzegovina and is of Romani origin. She earned her Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2014 from Banja Luka University’s Department of Painting In 2018 she graduated from Syracuse University with a Master of Fine Arts in Transmedia, Visual and Performing Arts.

In her art works, the ultimate aim is to protect and enable female bodies and enact a cross-scalar approach to collective self-emancipation of oppressed women. Selma’s search for functional, contemporary political resistance stems from her personal experience with oppression from various directions and scales. Selman is also the founder of the organization Get The Heck To School which aims to empower Roma girls all around the world who faced ostracization from society and poverty.

Selma Selman currently lives and works in Bihac, BIH and New York, USA.